Even in galaxies far far away there is instalove, or my review of Inherit the Stars

inherit the stars

Inherit the Stars (Inherit the Stars #1)

By: Tessa Elwood

Publisher: Running Press Kids

Publication Date: December 8th, 2015

Format: eARC

synopsis

Three royal houses ruling three interplanetary systems are on the brink of collapse, and they must either ally together or tear each other apart in order for their people to survive.

Asa is the youngest daughter of the house of Fane, which has been fighting a devastating food and energy crisis for far too long. She thinks she can save her family’s livelihood by posing as her oldest sister in an arranged marriage with Eagle, the heir to the throne of the house of Westlet. The appearance of her mother, a traitor who defected to the house of Galton, adds fuel to the fire, while Asa also tries to save her sister Wren’s life . . . possibly from the hands of their own father.

But as Asa and Eagle forge a genuine bond, will secrets from the past and the urgent needs of their people in the present keep them divided?

goodreads 2

amazon feather 2 book depository feather 2 indie bound feather 2

review

1 star (fairy)

Inherit the Stars was a disappointment. The premise sounded fantastic, royalty in space, sign me up, but the characters and the plot were boring and annoying. There was diversity, I’ll give the author that, but the book had not much going for it otherwise.

Asa wants to save her sister. A noble feat, especially since her father wants to pull the plug and there was a lot of guilt felt by Asa associated with the sister, Wren, and her current predicament that was rarely touched on and felt like a missed opportunity. However, Asa manipulating and putting in danger an agreement that is meant to save her family’s planetary system so she could maybe buy time for her sister in a rather convoluted fashion is ridiculous. Also, since the wedding was meant to be between her sister Emmie and Eagle, couldn’t it be argued that they were simply married by proxy? As the plot wore on, it became even more convoluted, with random technology thrown in and a scandalous twist of a truth bomb dropped in the middle.

In addition to the wild plot, Asa was annoying as hell. If you enjoy a character who won’t shut up whether you are inside her head or not, then this book is for you. If you hate it when characters babble so damn often that even other characters notice it, then run the other way. While Asa was talking my ear off, there was supposedly a romance blooming in the background, though I never saw it until suddenly Asa and Eagle are claiming how much they love one another, and I’m left wondering if they have both hit their heads or have confused adrenaline fueled bonding for actual feelings.

The political maneuverings and the world building could have been so much more. I never fully understood how the interplanetary travel worked, or the government for that matter. None of the worlds were detailed very well, except the blighted planets that were simply described as desolate. Inherit the Stars, while opening with rather poetic writing, made me quickly want to move on in search of something better.

emily name

If you like what you read above, please follow using one (or more) of the social media sites in the sidebar!

Disclaimer: The synopsis and cover picture were pulled from the book’s Goodreads page. Neither belong to us. A review copy was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

2 thoughts on “Even in galaxies far far away there is instalove, or my review of Inherit the Stars

    1. Yes! It could have been so great! I love sci-fi in space and romance and royalty (one of my favorites was Stitching Snow) so it sounded right up my alley but it just didn’t work.

Comments are closed.